Lord Frost urges Boris to trigger Article 16 as he slams EU negotiators – ‘No other option | Politics | News

Lord Frost says Brexit protocol must go

Lord Frost, who was previously CEO of the Scotch Whiskey Association, joined Nigel Farage on GB News’ Talking Pints ​​as the couple opted to share a pint of beer rather than stick to the distilled spirit. But Lord Frost’s 15-minute appearance alongside Mr Farage also saw the former Brexit minister call on the UK government to take decisive action on the Northern Ireland Protocol. The deal had been signed between Brexit Britain and the Brussels bloc when Lord Frost was working as Boris Johnson’s chief negotiator for leaving the European Union.

However, Lord Frost even told the former Brexit party leader that “much of the EU does not understand the intricacies, details and history of the issues in Northern Ireland”.

He added: “At the end of the day, I think they prioritized protecting their own single market over the Belfast Good Friday deal.

“I think whatever the rights and wrongs of how we got here, the Protocol has to change or go.

“I think there is no other choice.”

Before taking a sip from his pint, Lord Frost warned that the UK may have “no other choice” as the EU appears uninterested in changing its negotiating position.

Speaking about what the UK could do next, he said: “We’re going to have to act.

“I don’t think we’re left with a choice, whether it’s the infamous Article 16 or a replacement, I don’t think there’s any other option to protect the Belfast Good Friday Agreement and the integrity from the country.”

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‘No other option!’ Lord Frost urges Boris to trigger Article 16 as he slams EU negotiators (Picture: GB News)

Lord Frost has joined Nigel Farage on GB News' Talking Pints.

Lord Frost has joined Nigel Farage on GB News’ Talking Pints. (Picture: GB News)

Frost’s intervention comes as Sinn Fein, which has said it wants to hold a border poll on Irish reunification within the next five years, became the first nationalist party to hold the leadership positions in Stormont.

The Democratic Unionist Party, which had been Ulster’s largest party from 2003 to 2022, lost much of its support to the traditional tough Unionist voice of Jim Allister, mainly after loyalist opposition to protocol grew.

The DUP could also torpedo efforts to form a government in Stormont after Jeffrey Donaldson said he would not appoint a minister to the Northern Irish executive.

The MP for Lagan Valley said: ‘Until we get decisive action from the UK government on protocol, we will not be appointing ministers to the executive.

Unionists suggest the protocol poses a constitutional threat to the UK as they claim it erected a border on the Irish Sea and kept Northern Ireland in the EU’s orbit while Great Britain -Bretagne broke away from Brussels.

However, it has even been estimated that the border along the Irish Sea could have cost Ulster £850million a year.

According to the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency, £10.9 billion of Ulster’s £22.1 billion export and £13.2 billion of Ulster’s £20.3 billion import books went to the rest of the UK in 2020.

Lord Frost said the EU does not seem interested in changing its negotiating position.

Lord Frost said the EU does not seem interested in changing its negotiating position. (Image: Getty)

Lord Frost’s interview with the former UKIP leader also included discussions of the diplomat’s Brexit journey and what Britain can achieve outside the bloc.

Despite telling MSPs in the Scottish Parliament in 2015 that leaving the single market would cost the average Briton £1,500 a year, Lord Frost said he had Eurosceptic tendencies early in his diplomatic career in the 1990s.

Asked by Mr Farage if the Civil Service still regrets the decision taken in 2016, Lord Frost told GB News: ‘I think it’s still there, it’s definitely weakened since 2016, people have gotten used to the idea.”

However, Lord Frost also suggested that Whitehall was struggling to adapt after Britain regained control of many of its legal rights.

He said: ‘I think what people find difficult now in government, in public service, is suddenly in charge.

While he said he “liked” Michel Barnier, Lord Frost said: “He wasn’t sure he had ever considered me quite his equal.”

Mr Farage then suggested that the treaty Lord Frost had helped broker with Brussels was ‘not exactly a bargain’.

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Sinn Fein emerged as the largest party in last Thursday's election in Northern Ireland.

Sinn Fein emerged as the largest party in last Thursday’s election in Northern Ireland. (Image: Getty)

Frost said he believed Mr Johnson would lead the Tories in the next general election.

Frost said he believed Mr Johnson would lead the Tories in the next general election. (Image: Getty)

Lord Frost did not directly address Mr Farage’s assessment and instead said the government had inherited a tough hand from Theresa May’s negotiating team.

The former UK ambassador to Denmark also pointed out that efforts by Labor Hilary Benn and former Tory MP Alistair Burt to block a no-deal Brexit had had a negative impact on the UK’s negotiating position. .

He said: “At the end of the day we had to do our best and at least get rid of the backstop.

“If we hadn’t done that, we would still be negotiating to leave the EU customs union now and we have given ourselves freedom for the future and future negotiations that we have been doing.”

Breaking free from the Brussels customs orbit, Brexit Britain was able to sign tailor-made free trade agreements with Australia, New Zealand and Japan.

The UK is currently negotiating deals with India, Canada and several US states.

At the end of the interview with Mr Farage, Lord Frost also said he would consider ‘standing[ing] down” from the Lords to enter the House of Commons as an MP and said he believed Mr Johnson would lead the Tories in the next general election.


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Edward L. Robinett